Anti-Explosion Flashlights

What is an
Anti-Explosion (Ex approved) Flashlight

Lanterns intended for use in classified areas (explosive atmosphere).

What makes an
Anti-Explosion (Ex approved) Flashlight?

The on / off mechanism of a flashlight can generate a spark, which in place with an explosive atmosphere (classified areas) can generate an explosion.

Flashlights are also known as:

  • Intrinsically Safe
  • Anti-sparks
  • Armored
  • Explosion proof (wrong)

Characteristics of
Anti-Explosion (Ex approved) Flashlight:

Classified areas:

Any place subject to the probability of the existence or formation of an explosive atmosphere.

Explosive atmosphere:

It is a mixture of flammable substances in the form of gases, vapors, dusts or oxygen, which in contact with an ignition source may cause an explosion.

Example of how hazardous area zones can occur in typical classification circumstances ZONE0, ZONE1 and ZONE2:

ATEX zones for gases and vapours

Zone 0 (Class I Division 1) – A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of flammable substances in the of gas, vapor or mist is present continuously or for long periods or frequently.

Zone 1 (Class I Division 1) – A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air or flammable substances in the form of gas, vapor or mist likely to occur in normal operation occasionally.

Zone 2 (Class I Division 1) – A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air or flammable substances in the form of gas, vapor or mist likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

ATEX zones for dusts and fiber

Zone 20 (Class II Division 1) – Continuous release inside a dust containment enclosure gives rise to Zone 20 – a place in which an explosive atmosphere, in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air, is present continuously, or for long periods or frequently for short periods. For example, a mill or pneumatic conveying system.

Zone 21 (Class II Division 1) – Primary grade of release gives rise to Zone 21 – a place in which an explosive atmosphere, in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air, is likely to occur occasionally in normal operation. For example, bagging points and inspection ports that are frequently opened.

Zone 22 (Class II Division 1) – Secondary grade of release gives rise to Zone 22 – a place in which an explosive atmosphere, in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air, is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only. For example, leaks from incorrectly fitted lids or spillages.

ATEX marking

ATEX marking for explosive dust atmospheres

ATEX marking for explosive gas atmospheres

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